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20121101
20121130
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CSPAN2 25
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English 25
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
of columbus' trip. so, it certainly discusses columbus and his role in the discovery of america. you can't discover place where perhaps as many as 100 million people already live. one story about columbus and geography if i can, though. one of the things i love to do is the research, to go into the library, to look for the books, because it's always the unexpected discovery, the eureka moment, that i love so much. i remember going into find a book about columbus, a biography, and three books down on the same shelf there was the log books of cliff columbus. my goodness. nobody told me in junior high school that christopher columbus kept a log book of his voyages and wrote letters about his voyages. so i pulled that out just an unexpected discovery, and started to read it. and i was enthralled. here was columbus describing his voyages, describing his discoveries in his own words, and of course they are his words, so we have to remember that people write about themselves with a certain degree of prejudice, but it was one thing more than anything else caught me in the log becomes -- log book
book awards co-sponsored by the columbus foundation. we chose the name to indicate as far as we know know, there have been 30,000 years of steroid -- storytelling. so the border directors are john d. macarthur and the but finally the lawyer for the state of california. this event it is being co-sponsored we'll acknowledge their generosity to bring s to the historic room. we want to welcome richard hudson to greet you and it is professor of marriages and a member of the faculty of american studies and interdisciplinary program. he came to the uc berkeley english department 1964 although he continues teaching and tell this but he it is now president of the west literature association. and that the berkley's annual conference in october and then he said the buck with that. [laughter] >> i basically want to say one word. you happen to be in this tool room of the english department. i'd like other rooms has total control of this room because of the donation by the -- and alumni. but to say one word of a raging within the english department, since i came here almost 50 years ago, there has
everybody to the 33rd annual american book awards sponsored by the four columbus foundation. we choose the name to indicate that as far as we know there's been 30,000 years of storytelling in north america. so the members of our board of directors are john macarthur fellow, recipient of the presidential medal. the current chancellor of the academy of american poets and finally, the current lawyer for the state of california. this will be cosponsored by the english department and the african-american studies department. and we are acknowledged their generosity for bringing up to this historical room. that everybody would be able to find it. it's like a landmark. the great poets of the road, great of the world. we want to welcome richard hudson, professor to preaching on behalf of this department. he was professor emeritus and a member of the affiliated faculty of the american studies program and interdisciplinary program that was key founder 25 years ago. he came to you see berkeley's english department in 1964 and retired in 2009. although he's continued teaching until this summer. his
. they had gone into this room and taken out seven textbooks, like rethinking columbus a book that is sold hundreds of thousands of copied, used by kids in rural alaska all the way to rural maine who have that -- and that book was put away into storage. and 11 teachers, almost a dozen teachers were told that they no longer have the right to teach literature from the perspective of mexican-americans, those who have given us our school district from the perspective of rethinking columbus. .. i have to begin, and i will tell you something about our stories. i went to find my story. i had been living outside of tucson for years, and i wanted to come back, working on another book, and deeply ameshed, of course, in other struggles and conflicts as the journalist in the coal fields around the world, back east, the deep south, hearing about tucson, the phoenix i've known, fought with over u of a and asu and the ball game and heard about what was going on, and i was wondering like the rest of the country, what is the matter with arizona? i had to go back in 2010 and try to understand beyond the scr
article 15 most over redid route -- white people from columbus, ronald reagan and is shakespeare. the only worse speaking those words than a black person and stepping out of line. stay q4 stepping up four per cent volume a. is a beef and near if it was not so wrong. liberty is meaningless and it is not just a freedom of speech i will leave you with this the most accurate comment about her current book came from "the american spectator", "mugged" is not just a book but a public service. i agree wholeheartedly. and colder is a public service and i would take that over commander -- a community organizer and a day. please join me to welcome ann coulter 55. [cheers and applause] >> i hope this isn't like the chris christie speech. i did briefly a runoff with a biker buy came back. i am who paid by introduction is not longer than my speech because i will try something new. are worked very hard i write them out and rearrange them to make sure there are enough jokes and then memorize them and 1/2 no speech for this. but i wrote the book. so i know how it goes. [laughter] i that i could describe it
by the before columbus foundation and it was held at the university of california berkeley. tomorrow the miami book fair international kicks off in florida and we will take you live there at 6:00 p.m. eastern to hear tom wolfe, author of back to blood. booktv will be live next weekend for more of the festival. those are just a few of the programs we will bring you this weekend. visit booktv.org for complete schedule. >> here's a look at some books being published this week. bill haas surprise when another request president jefferson's political process and thomas jefferson, the art of power. in the patriarch, the remarkable like and turbulent times of joseph kennedy, david nasa chronicles the life and career of the political dynasty. judge andrew napolitano, senior political analyst for fox news argues presidents theodore roosevelt and woodrow wilson disregarded the constitution to promote their own political agendas in theodore and woodrow, how two american presidents destroyed constitutional freedoms. in far from the tree parents, children and the search for identity, national book award win
most overrated white people, columbus to reagan to shakespeare, and the only thing than being a white person speaking those words is being a black person who steps out of line. all you have to do is look at city sigh dash, and thank you, ann, for standing up for her value -- valiantly. we really appreciate that. it would be absurd if it was not so wrong. that's the truth. as for example rick douglass said liberty is purpose less if the seek to -- ann practices freedom of speech every single day, and i'll leave you with this. i think the most accurate comment about ann's current book came from jeffrey lord and the american spectator who said "mugged is not just a bug, -- book, but a public service." i agree with that wholeheartedly. [applause] ann coulter is, indeed, a public servant, and i take that public servant over community organizer any day. please join me in welcoming ann coulter. [cheers and applause] [applause] [cheers and applause] >> thank you, thank you. you're too kind. i hope this is not like christie's speech at convention where he got a bigger welcome than an exit. [la
that you should suppress that. we have columbus day parade for italian americans. we have polish-american parade. we a single tomato in texas. we even have and will american celebration. -- cinco de mayo in texas. it is a commemoration. as long as, it has to be on the right so level. you are an italian-american. you're an anglo-american. your hispanic american. and i talk to someone from germany last year who chose to become an american. and i said why. he said, you have so much more freedom here. in germany, there are tremendous expectations about what you're supposed to do and how you're supposed to behave, based on your family background. here, you are free. we want people who yearn for that freedom, to come to the united states. they always have. we want them to continue to do so. it's what makes us americans. >> we have a question down here, two questions. maybe if you could ask a question and then hands the microphone and ask both of them and tried to take both questions. >> all right. i'm a canadian working in the is on an h. on h-1b1 visa, a process which i won't wish on
, and in columbus, ohio in that time period, there were negative ads, almost all negative, quite effective, about bain, the auto industry bailout, and they were, you know, about policy proposals that were mischaracterizing mitt romney's policy proposals, but effective. that he would raise taxes on middle class for instance. we can't forget it was not a level playing field until really the very end, until after the convention when the general election funds were available to mitt romney which he needed to respond. we were not in all the markets in ohio. we were being outspent, and so that has a cumulative effect. it's difficult. i chaired ohio, and i'm too focused on ohio, but the same is true in the other swing states. it's tough to come back from there, but back to your question about, you know, how do you take policy issues and translate the way people care about? i think it's a huge challenge for us, and, again, i would suggest a loft people in the room share that challenge to the extent of forgetting partisanship here that you believe in policies that lead to economic growth, more jobs, and i
to campaign. super pacs came in but even then it was two to one. so if you are watching tv in columbus, ohio, you see a lot of negative ads. they were almost all negative. they were quite effective and they were about dean and the auto industry bailout and about policy proposals that were mr. rice, but they are pretty set. >> he would raise taxes on the middle class. we can't forget it was on a level playing field until the very end, even after mitt romney which he needed to respond, we're still not on the markets in ohio. we were still being outspent. but that has a cumulative effect. it's difficult. i share the effort in ohio, but i need to find the same thing as true and the other swing states. it's tough to come back from that. back to your question in a paddy to policy issues and translate in the way people care about, i do think it's a huge challenge for senate with just a lot of people in this room share the same challenge to the extent forgetting partisanship. that she believed in policies that lead to more economic growth and more jobs hurts sometimes to find among current employees
to the u.s. it's possible you could see the end of the arab spring at that conference held at columbus university in 2008. there's a matter of the public diplomacy people coming into the state department are often shunted off into consular work for eight years or whatever, for a long time before the ever get to any public diplomacy were. it's as though you're in the military and call your officers and send them off to, i don't know, do social work and then suddenly brought them back and said now you're in charge of the squadron. well anyway, but -- >> well, thank you, ambassador. and by the way, as far as the arab spring is concerned, i know that i was personally accused by some right wing bloggers having omitted the arab spring but i wish it were true, because of this event. although the event enabled me to do. the thing that was most fun of all of all the things that it did when i was undersecretary, which was that i got to call on the egyptian ambassador. i don't know if you really does, and made them come to my office and dressing gown which is sort of a great thing you can do trad
that. we have columbus day parades, polish american parades', cinco de am i yo and we even have anglo-american celebrations. i had a reporter say what does that look like? i said you've never been to the revolution meeting? it isn't much of a solution but it is a commemoration. you know, as long as the emphasis has to be on the right you are an italian-american, you are an anglo-american, hispanic american and i talked to somebody from germany last year who chose to become an american and i said why? he said you have so much more freedom here. in germany there are tremendous expectations about what you're supposed to do and how you're supposed to behave and based on your family background. here you are free. we want people who yearn for that freedom to come to the united states. they always have. we want them to continue to do so. it is what makes us americans. we have a question down here. >> mabey if you could ask your question and then ask both of them and we will try to take them. >> i'm a comedian working in the u.s. on an h-1b visa, a process that i wouldn't wish on my worst ene
with the anniversary of columbus' arrival in the americas. he aimed very high in the vision for the new school. the president, though, is not the first speaker. after an opening prayer, a princeton professor, henry van dyke, recited a lengthy poem call "texas: a democratic ode" that he wrote for the ceremony. this invoked images of wild bees, distant stars, and frontier pioneers. the dallas morning news reported that the audience listened to the poet's words, quote, "with the strictist attention with applause." now, the next speaker, the chief justice of texas spoke in prose. his review was nowhere near as good as the poet received. [laughter] now, in light of that, i thought the best course would be for me to compos a poem for this occasion. [laughter] again, there's no need to panic or run for the exits. i gave up that plan when i couldn't find suitable words that rimed with latin terms. [laughter] president lovitt spoke third and delivered the speech titled "the meaning of the new stietion." his essay is, in fact, a truly magnificent scholarly work with a thoughtful and prophetic vision on
started october 12th which he timed to coincide with the columbus' arrival in the americas. he aimed high in his vision for the new school. the president, though, is not the first speaker. after an opening prayer, a princeton professor, henry van dyke, recited a poem "texas,: a democratic ode" that he wrote for the ceremony. this is drawn from an indian legend invokes wild bees, stars, and frontier pioneers. "the dallas morning news" reported the audience listened with the strictist attention with frequent applause. now, the next speaker, the chief justice spoke in prose. his review was nowhere near as good as the poet received. [laughter] in light of that, i thought the best course would be for me to compos a poem for this occasion. [laughter] there's no need to panic or run for the exits i gave up the plan and couldn't think of words that rhymed with lat latin legal terms. [laughter] the essay is, in fact, a truly magnificently scholarly work presents thoughtful and prophetic vision of what the rice institution would become. i want to focus on one point made. he observedded the great ch
's elections. the president has stopped in madison, wisconsin, columbus, ohio, and later tonight in des moines, iowa. mitt romney also with a hectic schedule today campaigning in sanford, florida, then traveling to virginia for rallies in lynchburg and fairfax. later he's in columbus, ohio, and wraps up his campaign in manchester, new hampshire. tonight over on c-span we'll have live coverage of both candidates' final campaign rallies. that gets underway this evening at 10:50 eastern. c-span asked reporters from around the country what they'll be watching for tomorrow on election night. here's what a few of them had to say. >> i'm going to be watching the democratic margin in broward, dade and palm beach counties. it is critical for the president that he has very large numbers in those counties. that's where he builds up his lead. in 2008 the president won 14 of 67 counties. so he -- and, obviously, the more populace counties are the ones he won, but he needs to really win big in those counties by several hundred thousand votes. you know, the south florida margin in 2008 was 535,000 votes. and
of in the middle of ohio in columbus that is the battleground area there. obviously, with the cleveland area up in the northeastern part of the state being democratic and the cincinnati part out in the southwest being more republican, ohio just has a larger pool of these swing voters, if you will, and less -- and more evenly balanced between the democratic and republican regions of the state. pennsylvania has this huge portion of moderate sort of independent-minded voters, moderate in political ideology, and they can swing the state either way depending if they bounce back one way or another. for example, governor corbett, the current governor of our state, two years ago when republicans swept pennsylvania as they did many other parts of the state, for example, won every one of those swing counties that i've been talking about with the exception of two. so he won, for example, bucks county, he won chester county, he won lehigh county, he won northampton county, and he won a few on the fringe as well. so i think that -- i like to put it this way, we're not quite new jersey, meaning pretty blue,
take that remarkable statement with the interview that speaker boehner gave to politico in columbus, ohio, yesterday. we have both republican leaders going in ready to fight. they're not, they don't seem to be chastened at all. >> right. and go back and watch "60 minutes" from this past sunday where they had this segment -- it wasn't the best ever -- but there was an interesting interview with harry reid and membership mcconnell simultaneously told. i think the first interview they've done perhaps ever, and you watch the body language, and you understand why we have a broken senate, why we have a broken congress. the two of them just basically point the finger at the other, show no willingness to compromise, don't feel like they have to compromise because they feel they're winning the ideological war, and they feel that their opponent -- they vilify their opponent saying that they're the ones who are making the miscalculation, they're the ones that are making congress an inhospitable place as far as getting things done. >> and yet there's some evidence that there eventually will be
. there was a large, large african-american turnout. there was also white liberal turnout. a suburb in columbus, places where the other part of the obama coalition came out. the kristen may put a very small role but it didn't fundamental change ohio, and i think that story was well overplayed. was a way to election? no. it was close. but there were some things that win in both direction. one thing i often like to look at his it happened to the state legislatures. and here you can see some big wave of elections like 2010 for republicans where they gained 720 seats across the country out of about 6500. the early numbers are to be a move in a democratic direction, about 186 or so. but what's interesting really is not everything was going in the same direction. look at blue states, definite movement and the democratic direction but there's also some movement back to the red states in the other direction. states like maine and minnesota, part of new hampshire legislature went democratic, went democratic the. change democratic majority. but republicans picked up legislation in arkansas. big gains in
. if you're watching tv in columbus, ohio, during that time period you were seeing a lot of negative ads. they were almost all negative. they were quite effective. they were about bain and they were about the auto industry bailout and they were about policy proposals that were mischaracterizing that romney's policy proposals but they were pretty effective. >> raise taxes on -- >> raise taxes on the middle class, for instance. we can't forget it was not a level playing field until really the very end. even after the convention when the general election funds were available to mitt romney which he needed to be able to try to respond we were still not on all markets in ohio. we were still being outspent. so that has a cumulative effect. it is difficult, i chaired the effort in ohio so i'm maybe too focused on ohio i think you find the same thing is true in the other swing states. it is tough to come back from that. back to your question how do you take these policies issues and translate them the way people care about, i do think it is a huge challenge for us. i would suggest a lot of peopl
. they have contributed to our culture. and we are not saying that you should suppress the. we have columbus day parade for italian americans. we have polish-american bridge. we have include a mile in texas. we even have anglo-american celebration i had reported say what's it look like? i said if you ever been to the american revolution meeting? it's a commemoration. as long as -- it has to be on the right. you're an italian-american. you're in anglo-american. hispanic american. and i talk to someone from germany last year who chose to become an american, and i said why. he said, you have so much more freedom here. in germany, there are tremendous expectations about what you're supposed to do and how you're supposed to behave, based on your family background. here you are free. we want people who yearn for that freedom to come to deny states. they always have that we want him to continue to do so. it's what makes us americans. >> we have a question down here. may be if you could answer questions in hand the microphone and will try to take both questions. >> i'm a canadian working in u.s. on
spent 3-1. yes some super pacs temmins if you are watching tv in columbus ohio you were seeing a lot of negative ads. there were quite effective. they were about the auto industry bailout and policy proposals for mischaracterizing but they were pretty effective. so, we can't forget that it wasn't a level playing field until the end even after the convention when they were available to mitt romney which he needed to be able to try to respond we still were not on all of the markets in ohio and we were being held spent and said that as a cumulative affect. i chaired the effort in ohio but he would find the same thing is true in the other swing states. back to your question how do you take these policy issues and translate them i do think it is a huge challenge and i would suggest a lot of people in the room share the same challenge to the extent of getting partisanship that you believe and policies that lead to economic growth and jobs you will find it's tough to communicate. i'm a former trade representative and i use trade as an example i but suggest to many of you to depend on a glob
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)